Author Topic: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties  (Read 3444 times)

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Offline ComSoft6128

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #50 on: 17:54, 04 August 19 »
PD Graphics 19.

1. GRAPHO.BAS - working this time (thanks @AMSDOS ) - this one needs a health warning attached
2. HOLE.BAS - a duplicate? Seems like I've seen this before, also it is slow in operation go to 10:00 to see the finished product.
3. HYPNO.BAS (AKA Space Tunnel)
4. HYPNOTIC.BAS

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyEpqJp87ks
« Last Edit: 18:04, 04 August 19 by ComSoft6128 »

Offline AMSDOS

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #51 on: 14:00, 05 August 19 »
PD Graphics 19.

1. GRAPHO.BAS - working this time (thanks @AMSDOS ) - this one needs a health warning attached


Very Unusual.

Quote
2. HOLE.BAS - a duplicate? Seems like I've seen this before, also it is slow in operation go to 10:00 to see the finished product.


Seems to start off the same way as -INDENT.BAS from PD Graphics 13, though -INDENT.BAS continues a series of FILLs. This might have been written by the same person perhaps? Seems to be an unknown author.

Quote
3. HYPNO.BAS (AKA Space Tunnel)


From AA18 Type-Ins known as Space Tunnel.

Quote
4. HYPNOTIC.BAS


Funny I didn't recognise this one, but was published in AA15 Type-Ins (Dec '86).
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Offline ComSoft6128

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #52 on: 17:33, 08 August 19 »
PD Graphics 20.

1. KSCOPE.BAS
2. KSCOPE1.BAS
3. MODEFOUR.BAS - LISTed only
4. MORSE.BAS - LISTED only
5. NEBULA.BAS
6. NUMBERS.BAS

MODEFOUR and MORSE don't play with the OSSC so if anyone can tell me what they do I'd appreciate it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sl24uu2HjfM

Offline AMSDOS

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #53 on: 05:27, 09 August 19 »
PD Graphics 20.

1. KSCOPE.BAS
2. KSCOPE1.BAS


I thought I saw these in an earlier video, but yeah now their running in MODE 2 (instead of MODE 1 which is what I thought they did), the 2nd version (the faster of the two) has a Direct Control Code in it, making it a Magazines Nightmare if they were going to Publish it. The Control Code I suspect is to change the Screen Write Mode, normally this defaults as Fill, but here I think they have changed it to XOR, which works by Write Character to screen to PRINT it, write it again in the same position, Character is deleted. A good example of that is Sean McManus' Easi-Sprite Driver with Printed Batman Sprite Demonstration.


Quote
3. MODEFOUR.BAS - LISTed only


There are others here which will know more about the OUT commands, the ones used here relate to the Video to generate effects, things like Overscan to print an image across the entire screen with No Border is an example of that, but here what they have done is Stretch the Screen, so instead of 25 Lines you only get 15 and the Black Lines through the Cursor are as a result of that Stretch, so now the MODE 0 Cursor looks like a Square instead of a Rectangle. The other lines which follow the OUT commands (to generate that 'Fourth Mode') are there to tell BASIC to restrict itself to that new mode, put simply BASIC doesn't know that 10 Lines are Missing and still thinks there are 25 Lines, which there is, but 10 Lines have been hidden away & you can only see them when you push the text up the screen with Return/Enter or the Down Arrow Key for example, so it's the WINDOW #0 job to only show that 20x15 Lines. The ORIGIN which follows it does pretty much the same thing for the Graphical Cursor, so the ORIGIN will now move the Graphical Cursor 160 up the screen, so now a PLOT 0,0,15 will PLOT a bottom point Left Corner of the New screen, like the WINDOW if ORIGIN were changed back to its original position 0,0 the pixel won't be screen as it is now offscreen. This demo Sets up the Screen INKs before using the OUT sequence, the reason for that is once the OUT commands are used, INKs won't be changed unless the Screen MODE changes (I can't quite explain the reasoning for that, I think it's just something which happens when Direct Hardware is used with BASIC which talks to the Firmware and Firmware with Direct Hardware don't necessarily know what's occurred.

Quote
4. MORSE.BAS - LISTED only


Not sure about this one, guessing you type in a message and it converts it to Morse Code, normally the Morse Code type-ins I've seen convert a Message into the SOUNDs produced, but there's no SOUND in this one, by the looks the Message is converted to a series of 1s and 0s.

Quote
5. NEBULA.BAS
6. NUMBERS.BAS


NUMBER.BAS is Selection Sort by Willie Lawrie, published Sept. 1989 Issue of ACU as a 10-Liner, just as NEBULA.BAS was as Spiral Nebula by Ian Graham in Feb. 1990 Issue of ACU.


EDIT: I've attached some screenshots of the MODE 4 example, one of the actual demo and a second after I did a BORDER 1:MODE 0 to show it's Box Screen.

« Last Edit: 05:30, 09 August 19 by AMSDOS »
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Offline ComSoft6128

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #54 on: 08:03, 09 August 19 »
Thanks for the info and screenshots @AMSDOS ,

Next and possibly final video will be posted Saturday. The few programs left on these disks cause the OSSC to lose sync and therefore can't be recorded. So if you (or anyone else) has seen a program of interest in the Catalogue of these discs that hasn't been in a previous video let me know and I will LIST it.

Cheers,

Peter
« Last Edit: 08:08, 09 August 19 by ComSoft6128 »

Offline AMSDOS

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #55 on: 08:48, 09 August 19 »
Cool,  I was trying to work out which one of those earlier demos KSCOPE1.BAS was from and discovered it was FANCYCLS.BAS. The Source Code is identical.
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Offline rambler

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #56 on: 10:11, 09 August 19 »
MORSE.BAS
Show the letters you type in as morse code.
SOS will be ...---...




Offline ChaRleyTroniC

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
« Reply #57 on: 20:31, 09 August 19 »
2. The Display Machine (Display.bas) by Richard Fairhurst. This mimics the LED displays often found in shops and businesses. This excellent program and "Bigrscoll" were the only two large text scrollers that were good enough to be used at the All Formats Computer Fairs back in the early to mid-nineties.




I just watched that and wondered who the Zoe was that I was supposedly saying hi to... but I think Alan Scully must have changed the scrolling message.  :D

Offline ComSoft6128

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #58 on: 20:38, 09 August 19 »
Zoe also features in at least one other scroller from Scull PD so maybe scrollers were the CPC equivalent of Tinder back then ;)
« Last Edit: 20:41, 09 August 19 by ComSoft6128 »

Offline ComSoft6128

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #59 on: 10:26, 10 August 19 »
Video 21A.

Unfortunately, unless I find another graphics disk this will be the last video in this series.
Please note that audio is out of sync by about 9 seconds.

This time:

1. PATTERNS.BAS
2. PRIMES.BAS - Ooops! Prime number generator.
3. PUDDLE.BAS
4. QUIKSNOW.BAS
5. SHAPE3D.BAS - Duplicate?
6. SNOW.BAS - Snow no show - any idea why?
7. SNOWFLAK.BAS
8. WHEEL.BAS - Looks familiar
9. WIRE.BAS -Not much to see here

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mPTm0_P4Ys
« Last Edit: 07:48, 15 August 19 by ComSoft6128 »

Offline AMSDOS

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #60 on: 14:18, 10 August 19 »
Video 21.

Unfortunately, unless I find another graphics disk this will be the last video in this series.
Please note that audio is out of sync by about 9 seconds.

This time:

1. PATTERNS.BAS
2. PRIMES.BAS - Ooops! Prime number generator.
3. PUDDLE.BAS
4. QUIKSNOW.BAS
5. SHAPE3D.BAS - Duplicate?


No I noticed this was a part of Video 4 of this thread.

Quote
6. SNOW.BAS - Snow no show - any idea why?


There's a Syntax Error in Line 40 (it should read POKE i,RND*255 instead of POKE i,RND255), but the problem is Line 30 sets all the Colours to 0, so you cannot see anything.
It's nothing exciting though and I think you would of ran into problems showing this in the Video as it uses the Hardware Video effects to make the Screen Wobble all over the place, hence a TV Snow effect, requiring a Reset. Takes about 90 seconds to set that up before it does it's thing.

Quote
7. SNOWFLAK.BAS


Seems to be a popular theme here in Oz!

Quote
8. WHEEL.BAS - Looks familiar


Ditto, but couldn't find from where - may have viewed it in earlier video.

Quote
9. WIRE.BAS -Not much to see here


That's because it uses Joystick to draw Lines Up/Down/Left Right on the Screen, Fire Button will change the Colour. Once you're finished Drawing a Pattern, Pressing the Space Bar takes you to another part of the programme which I think Rotates the Colours around until the Fire Button is pressed.
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Offline ComSoft6128

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #61 on: 15:00, 10 August 19 »
Thanks @AMSDOS ,

I'll have another look at SNOW.BAS and WIRE.BAS tomorrow.

Cheers,

Peter

Offline ComSoft6128

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #62 on: 17:14, 10 August 19 »
Funny the things you find sometimes .......

NUMBERS.BAS from video No. 20

http://www.lawrieweb.com/www/amstrad.html

Offline Nich

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #63 on: 12:09, 11 August 19 »
I'll have another look at SNOW.BAS and WIRE.BAS tomorrow.

Be careful with SNOW.BAS. It sends random values to the CRTC chip to make it simulate a broken TV display that needs retuning - but sending random values to the CRTC is not a good idea as I think it may damage your monitor if the program is left running for too long!

Offline ComSoft6128

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #64 on: 17:20, 11 August 19 »
Thanks for the heads up Nich,

Ran it for two minutes this morning and all I got was a black screen so just gave up on it.








Offline AMSDOS

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #65 on: 12:20, 12 August 19 »
Be careful with SNOW.BAS. It sends random values to the CRTC chip to make it simulate a broken TV display that needs retuning - but sending random values to the CRTC is not a good idea as I think it may damage your monitor if the program is left running for too long!


 ???  I should have picked that up. ACU must of got into all sorts of trouble for publishing it, having said that I remember the one-liner Shabaz Yousaf wrote, which also sends random values to &BD00, which ironically comes from the Smash TV Issue of AA (75). Would have to be the most unless of codes surely?  >:(


Later on I remember a reader writing to AA regarding Overscan in their Forum section, but no source code was actually provided.
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Offline ComSoft6128

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #66 on: 12:24, 12 August 19 »
FUZZY.BAS (Video 17) was OK to use?

Offline pelrun

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #67 on: 13:42, 12 August 19 »
FUZZY is fine, but it relies on the CPC firmware leaving CRTC register 13 selected after a MODE change, as it doesn't select it explicitly. Had to go check that one.

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #68 on: 14:15, 12 August 19 »
FUZZY is fine, but it relies on the CPC firmware leaving CRTC register 13 selected after a MODE change, as it doesn't select it explicitly. Had to go check that one.


I'm not as sure as it has no "OUT &BC00,x" prior to OUT &BD00,INT(RND*256)", so it leaves me thinking what Register is it meant to be selecting. A lack of one has me assuming it's meant to be Register 0 - "OUT &BC00,0" for Horizontal Total. In that case and I'm using the Naked Video guide from AA53 as Reference, Recovery Ranges (values which will be able to acceptable within a BASIC programme and allowed to be restored back to normal with "OUT &BD00,63"), between 46 & 255. Shabaz Yousaf's TV Demo from the AA75 Type-Ins also has the same instruction minus the Register it's meant to be selecting.
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Offline pelrun

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #69 on: 15:27, 12 August 19 »
I'm not as sure as it has no "OUT &BC00,x" so it leaves me thinking what Register is it meant to be selecting.


That's why I said I had to check it. MODE definitely returns with register 13 selected, and the program doesn't do anything that would change it afterwards.

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #70 on: 07:59, 15 August 19 »
Video 21B - WIRE.BAS revisited.

Cheers @AMSDOS for the joystick hint - the second I started to use it I remembered playing about with this program 25  :o  years ago.
It seems to me like a much more primitive version of the commercial program "Pyschedelia" by Jeff Minter - both allow the displayed graphic to be modified by the user.

Wikipedia entry:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychedelia_(light_synthesizer)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3hQlqHk8VE
« Last Edit: 09:19, 15 August 19 by ComSoft6128 »

Offline AMSDOS

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #71 on: 01:16, 17 August 19 »




That's why I said I had to check it. MODE definitely returns with register 13 selected, and the program doesn't do anything that would change it afterwards.


Sorry, I misread your comments about register 13 being selected, I did a quick test with CPCBox which seems to be the case, so Register 13 represents the Low Byte of the screen, adjusting that with whatever value (0-255), shifts the screen horizontally, so it shouldn't be any problems with that particular register.



Video 21B - WIRE.BAS revisited.

Cheers @AMSDOS for the joystick hint - the second I started to use it I remembered playing about with this program 25  :o  years ago.
It seems to me like a much more primitive version of the commercial program "Pyschedelia" by Jeff Minter - both allow the displayed graphic to be modified by the user.



I'm familiar with Pyschedelia but haven't used it, it seems Jeff Minter wrote the original and was ported to the Amstrad by Simon Freeman.
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Offline ComSoft6128

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #72 on: 09:39, 13 October 19 »
NEWGRAP.BAS

Modified version of GRAP.BAS from video 18.
From the WACCI PD library.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTAPMMu325A&feature=youtu.be

https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/WACCI

Not emulated - original hardware and software
Please note that the aspect ratio for this YouTube video is 16:9 but the CPC monitor has an aspect ratio of 4:3 so you may wish to adjust your viewing device accordingly.

Offline AMSDOS

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Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
« Reply #73 on: 12:15, 13 October 19 »
I've seen similiar pattern generator demos before, though what stands out about this one is the control codes it has placed on the 1st couple of lines of the code, which make it a problem if they were to be published in a magazine. The 1st line for exmaple has a Machine code routine embeded after the Apostophe to indicate a Comment line, I remember noticing a Game from a French Magazine using the same techique, though couldn't get it to work, probably because I didn't understand what the accented u on their keyboard meant, which I think on an English keyboard is the Bar Command for RSX, but there might of been others I've forgotten about.
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