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General Category => Applications => Topic started by: ComSoft6128 on 18:30, 15 April 19

Title: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 18:30, 15 April 19
Small (1K to 3K) BASIC files from various PD libraries:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhLWM927eW4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhLWM927eW4)
Title: Re: Small PD graphic display files
Post by: AMSDOS on 01:06, 23 April 19
I recognise the programme called 464TYPE.BAS running at 6:50..8:47, which is the 464 version of 3D Hidden Line Removal Graph by John Valentine, published in AA33 (June 1988) (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_June_1988_Type-Ins)  :D
Title: Re: Small PD graphic display files
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 17:34, 05 May 19
Catalogue of PD Graphics disk - 176 files - 16 of which will be shown in 3 videos over the next few days. Each of the BASIC programs will Run for a few minutes and then listed for examination.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eu2_aO8Ypgo
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 08:03, 06 May 19
Video No. 2
Four BASIC programs - Eye (your CPC is keeping tabs on you), Loopy, Mosaic and Nudenoir. The programs are Run and then listed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7I6O9MJi-M (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7I6O9MJi-M)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 13:04, 06 May 19
I immediately recognise Mosaic which was from AA45 Type-Ins (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_June_1989_Type-Ins).
I've also recoded it to work in Hisoft Pascal 4t (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/programming/hisoft-pascal-4t/msg114522/#msg114522) which draws it at a blistering pace.
Eye was written by Sean McManus was published in AA84 Type-ins (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_September_1992_Type-Ins).
Loopy appears to be 3D Loops from AA17 Type-Ins (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_February_1987_Type-Ins).



Following our recent discussions regarding the BASIC 1.1 FILL command, I had some success converting a 10-Liner called House from April '91 issue of ACU to work on the 464. The good news is it's still within the 10 Line Limit. I posted the results in an article on my LinkedIn page. (https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/filling-them-ol-basic-10-liners-464-out-bush/)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 14:51, 06 May 19
Thanks for the info AMSDOS,

Videos 3 and 4 will be along in a day or so, if you have any background on the programs featured in them that would also be appreciated.

Cheers,

Peter
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: Nich on 23:53, 06 May 19
Well, I think the NUDENOIR file wouldn't have featured as a type-in listing in any British CPC magazine! :laugh:
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 08:05, 07 May 19
You're right there Nich, Amstrad Computer User and Amstrad Action were not known for their "Page 3 lovelies" :D

Now for Video No. 3
Five programs featured - Planets (Sloooow - forward to 4:10 to get to the end product), Poly1 (line 205 contains a statement I've never seen in a BASIC program before), Pyramid, Reaction and Rebound.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_2oph88lO8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_2oph88lO8)

Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 13:58, 07 May 19
You're right there Nich, Amstrad Computer User and Amstrad Action were not known for their "Page 3 lovelies" :D 


I only remember The Surprise Listing from Issue 1 of what would become ACU. I'm unsure if any of our Junior Jotters left any Surprise Listings in The Amstrad User magazine, but there was a Drawing Program available for anyone looking to draw genitalia.  :picard:


Quote
Now for Video No. 3Five programs featured - Planets (Sloooow - forward to 4:10 to get to the end product), Poly1 (line 205 contains a statement I've never seen in a BASIC program before), Pyramid, Reaction and Rebound.


Planets came from AA40 Type-Ins, I don't know anything about it, only that it made me check another program called Celestial Bodies from AA27 Type-Ins. That program was Republished by Nick Hutton in the Jan 1991 Issue of ACU titled "Let there be light (and gravity)", in Nich's ACU notes the 2 listings are compared, the ACU version comes with a little Menu to select what you want to do, I can see where many of the similarities come into play, the Nick Hutton version also has M/C routine along with Source Code following the Listing, which isn't in the original, I guess the main problem with the Nick Hutton version being the original coder wasn't acknowledge.


I'm unsure where Poly1 comes from, but it looks impressive. I looked it up on CPC-Power and they have put it around Dec '88/Jan '89, source code  (http://www.cpc-power.com/index.php?page=detail&onglet=notices&num=13612) confirms it, but it's nowhere to be found on the CPCWiki AA Type-Ins pages on either Dec '88 or Jan '89. EDIT:For some reason this program has been overlooked on the CPCWiki Page, I found it hidden away in AA40 along with the remainder of the Solar System program.


Pyramid is also another AA Type-Ins Issue 16 (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_Christmas_1986_Type-Ins).
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 20:22, 07 May 19
This short video shows the listing for the screenshot utility "Breaker", this version by Alastair Scott.  Unfortunately it is incompatible with the OSSC meaning that, for the moment, I am unable to show it in operation. It is relevant to this thread because I found it essential in capturing the graphics created by some of the programs previously show. The captured screens could then be loaded into Advanced Art Studio or converted to MicroDesign format.
I can't remember if I ever tried it with games so I'm not sure if it would work with (some) of them.

Would any programmers like to comment?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KudqPqY_Q4Q (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KudqPqY_Q4Q)



http://www.cpc-power.com/index.php?page=staff&stafftype=1&lenom=Alastair%20SCOTT (http://www.cpc-power.com/index.php?page=staff&stafftype=1&lenom=Alastair%20SCOTT)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 01:58, 08 May 19
I'm somewhat puzzled where or when this was published despite it clearly stating it was July '87 and based on a small programme RpM created June '87 AA. All I could find there was an Assembly Routine in Hackers Only (in the Hot Tips section of AA21) with the same Address Origin as the programme here which is used to setup new commands for BASIC, I'm unsure if it relates to this file though, merely that it's from that issue, AA state with that though that the M/C needs modifying to operate on the 464/664/6128.


It wouldn't work with Commercial Games as they turn off the Interrupts, I'm unsure if it would work with something like Space Storm II, maybe worth a try. It just seems limited that you can only take one image at a time. Regarding if it could be used with Advanced Art Studio, again I'm unsure, I think from memory AAS saves its Palettes with the extension ".PAL", I'm not sure if that extension needs to be that in order for AAS to load and use the correct Palette.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 09:14, 09 May 19
Video No. 4
BASIC files displayed/listed:
Revcirc, RSPG, Scenery (what scenery?), Shape3D, Shapes, Spiral and Startrek (nothing to get excited about).

Shapes and Spiral will probably have to be revisited in a later video as I forgot to soft reset between programs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-j32DeYOhM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-j32DeYOhM)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 12:51, 09 May 19



* RSPG - Is Random Symmetrical Patterns (unsure what the 'G' stands for - Generator?) from AA21 Type-Ins (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_June_1987_Type-Ins).


Scenery looks like something from the TRON film.  :D


* Shapes - Is Shapemaker from AA20 Type-ins (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_May_1987_Type-Ins).


Spiral is very slow, maybe a good one to code with Hisoft Pascal 4t, I don't understand why it's slow though.  :(


* Star Trek - Is Wander through Space from AA16 Type-Ins (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_Christmas_1986_Type-Ins), it too takes a while to setup before travelling through space (INK Palette Rotation style).


A few of these are using INK Palette Rotation with Revcirc, RSPG, Scenery, Star Trek for example to Animate (give the appearance of movement) for effect. Quite popular to do as well since Locomotive BASIC performed it well.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 16:40, 09 May 19
Thanks for the links AMSDOS,

I definitely have one or two of the other programs shown on the pages.
Re. Spiral - I forgot to reset the 6128 between programs - would the fact that the previous program was still in memory and had been Run have an effect on the speed?, could certain values/parameters have been defined (by the previous program) that would alter performance?

Cheers,

Peter
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 10:18, 10 May 19
Thanks for the links AMSDOS,

I definitely have one or two of the other programs shown on the pages.
Re. Spiral - I forgot to reset the 6128 between programs - would the fact that the previous program was still in memory and had been Run have an effect on the speed?, could certain values/parameters have been defined (by the previous program) that would alter performance?

Cheers,

Peter


Hi Peter,


I don't understand what's happening, there seems to be a number of different things happening despite running through the same core code.


I entered it in CPCBox the Online CPC Emulator and this was my result:

(http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/applications/small-pd-graphic-display-files/?action=dlattach;attach=28740)


I wouldn't of thought having another program running previously would play a performance on Speed, I tried other things like "RAD" and "DEG" as they play a role for the COS() and SIN() functions, but had no joy there. What baffles me is how your slowly generated Spiral is neatly filled in (no gaps between the Red & Yellow), unlike the output from the Emulator which produces something more traditional to how the Amstrad draws circular objects. The drawing of it too ran normally, but I didn't have anything running before it, so I don't know why that was occurring in your situation :(
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 17:46, 10 May 19
Hi AMSDOS,

Cheers for the screen-shot,
I think I remember this program now, I used it (25 years ago  :o ) to create the images below which are 17K screens (grabbed using Breaker.bas) then converted to MicroDesign format.
On Sunday I will look at this program again, then try to replicate the effect by running Shapes.bas first and see what happens.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 09:39, 14 May 19
Shapes and Spiral revisited:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWyoEzOViXc&feature=youtu.be
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 06:02, 16 May 19
Initially I thought it might of been the Arrays that Shapes sets up being the culprit, I initially tested this with CLEAR which reverted Spiral back into its old self, but CLEAR as I've recently encountered from the Destination Saturn game, does many things.
To properly test, I loaded the Shapes programme, ran it and then used "ERASE co" and "ERASE si" to clear those Arrays and then load Spiral, but that didn't change the outcome (still producing that FILLed look).
I then looked at ORIGIN because I noticed both programmes were using it, I tested this by resetting the computer, loading Spiral and then placing the ORIGIN from Shapes prior to the ORIGIN in Spiral, but that didn't change a thing (producing that Quick Wired Effect look).
And then finally I noticed Shapes was using DEG to calculate in, for some reason I thought Spiral was using it too, but when I checked I couldn't find any!  :o Normally the default BASIC refers to is RAD for calculating in Radians, however when DEG is used the computer switches to calculating in DEGrees - the classic examples from the Manuals being the Circle graphics, switching from RAD to DEG the Circle is Drawn differently. I simply found by adding line "11 DEG", the drawing is transformed, but according to my Manual, simply loading or running another file should return BASIC to RADian mode. ??? (the same occurs when NEW & CLEAR are also used, which is why Spiral was running normally after I used CLEAR, but I'm not sure why it's not happening when LOAD"filename or RUN"filename are used). 
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 19:32, 16 May 19
Cheers AMSDOS,

A question:

Could the values manually input for shapes (6,6,2,2,2,2) have some effect here?

I see that the initial design that shapes produces takes up the usual 17K screen area but after the above values are entered the new design is tiny in comparison.

Unfortunately I can't check this myself until the beginning of next week but just a thought.


Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 13:42, 17 May 19
Cheers AMSDOS,

A question:

Could the values manually input for shapes (6,6,2,2,2,2) have some effect here?


I don't think so, it seems to be an extraordinary set of circumstances has occurred to get the Spiral graphic occurring that way.
Originally I said that I was trying RAD/DEG and had no luck, I think this was because I wasn't adding DEG or RAD to the code. However once I added line 11 DEG, I reproduced that slow filled in Graphic which you had after immediately running SPIRAL.BAS after SHAPE.BAS.
The extraordinary circumstances I raised has to do with how the Graphic programmes were loaded, I did some tests which seem to confirm what happened.


The default in BASIC is set to RAD mode, this can be tested with print cos(1), which prints 0.540302306. Change this to DEG mode and then print cos(1) and you get 0.999847695. If you RUN"SHAPES.BAS, exit it after it's little demo, PRINT COS(1), it should still be 0.999847695. Now RUN"SPIRAL.BAS and it will produce that Slow Filled in Spiral effect (which is doing it while the computer is in DEG mode). If you exit that and then RUN it again, I'm guessing the programme will revert to the other Fast Spiral, this is because there's no DEG in it and when a RUN command is issued the BASIC will defer back to the default, which is RAD mode. For some reason when working from one programme to the next, if RUN"<filename.BAS> is used, the computer will simply load and run the file, but not alter any of the settings, this is what I believe has happened here. If you had used <ESCape> from the SHAPE.BAS file, and LOAD"SPIRAL.BAS it would have loaded into Memory and required RUN, the programme should of run normally instead of what you had.
In my Manual it states that the use of NEW or CLEAR would return some of those defaults which includes RAD mode if it was in DEG mode. Obviously they don't return everything to normal such as screen inks or even Key Commands (if there are any), though my Manual also includes LOAD and RUN. This doesn't seem to run true for LOAD as I entered the machine into DEG mode PRINT COS(1) and then LOADed a file, after that I PRINT COS(1), which gave the same result for DEG mode. For the RUN command, if the programme has no DEG in it, the RUN command will defer to RAD mode, but this doesn't seem to be the case with RUN"filename.BAS, but in your case you've been filming this on a real CPC6128 I assume and since you RUN"SHAPE.BAS followed by RUN"SPIRAL.BAS" seems to be suggesting the manual maybe incorrect - certainly if LOAD"SPIRAL.BAS" doesn't change the DEG mode from the SHAPE.BAS programme, I guess have a look when you can.

Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 18:07, 17 May 19
Thanks AMSDOS for that very detailed explanation.
I will have a quick check when next back in Glasgow and see what the result is.

Now for PD graphics video 5.

Five BASIC programs this time.

1. Surfaces.bas - this produces a pseudo 3D image which seems vaguely familiar. Unless you are in a masochistic frame of mind I would suggest you forward to 20:35 when it completes the design :o    (starts at 1:30)

2. Strobe.bas - reminds me of mosiac.bas from a previous video.   (starts at 22:35)

3. Swirl.bas   (starts at 24:20)

4. Tipple.bas   (starts at 25:50)

5. Torus.bas - again best to forward this one (to 44:15) - unless you would like to wait 17 minutes to see the end product - I forgot to List this program but have done so in video 6.   (starts at 27:06)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xQrHoNvPnU&t=88s (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xQrHoNvPnU&t=88s)


If anyone would like copies of these programs please send a 3" or 3.5" disk and a SAE and I will get them back in about a week to ten days.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 06:53, 18 May 19
Thanks AMSDOS for that very detailed explanation.
I will have a quick check when next back in Glasgow and see what the result is.

Now for PD graphics video 5.

Five BASIC programs this time.

1. Surfaces.bas - this produces a pseudo 3D image which seems vaguely familiar. Unless you are in a masochistic frame of mind I would suggest you forward to 20:35 when it completes the design :o    (starts at 1:30)


I'm not familiar with this one at all and from the looks has come from an Australian magazine, though occasionally the UK mags would of had something from Australia or New Zealand as well. I guess if it was out of a Computing With The Amstrad magazine that would of stated it, but it hasn't, so it maybe from the Aussie Magazine 'The Amstrad User".

Quote
2. Strobe.bas - reminds me of mosiac.bas from a previous video.   (starts at 22:35)


Yes that's because Strobe.bas and Mosiac.bas are from the same author and published together June 1989 issue of AA (Issue 45) (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_June_1989_Type-Ins).

Quote
3. Swirl.bas   (starts at 24:20)


I didn't recognise this one at all and then when it was LISTed, was surprised to see it came from AA8 (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_May_1986_Type-Ins) May '86 (they had quite a few graphical demos in them early issues that it becomes difficult to remember them all).

Quote
4. Tipple.bas   (starts at 25:50)


I'm not familiar with this Demo, but it reminded me of another which was published in AA58 (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_July_1990_Type-Ins) called Twister. In that you can select to either go up or down the screen. The effects are similar, but the Source Code is anything but.

Quote
5. Torus.bas - again best to forward this one (to 44:15) - unless you would like to wait 17 minutes to see the end product - I forgot to List this program but have done so in video 6.   (starts at 27:06)

I remember this one being in AA, but had to hunt it down to find it in AA14 Nov. '86 (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_November_1986_Type-Ins), this is really cool and couldn't believe how short the code is. It looks like a good one to convert into Hisoft Pascal which would help Draw up the effects quicker.

Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 19:35, 18 May 19
PD graphics video 6.

In the Protext file I use "Sanatised", dear dear - really should have used Prospell!
Also, the catalogue at the end of the video for User area 3 shows what looks like the software for the Rombo Vidi Digitiser but I'll check that out in a few days.

Four BASIC programs in this  video.

1 Torus (again) this time Listed and I agree it creates a really nice effect.

2. Triangles (A.k.a. Tunnel)

3. Twister

4. Twofor1 (Unusual name, I wonder why it was called this)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaVyN-Ihgg8&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaVyN-Ihgg8&feature=youtu.be)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 10:17, 19 May 19

1 Torus (again) this time Listed and I agree it creates a really nice effect.


I spent part of yesterday coding this one with Hisoft Pascal, the Drawing takes around 6-7 minutes before doing it's dazzling INK palette rotation.

Quote
2. Triangles (A.k.a. Tunnel)


Comes from AA21 Type-Ins (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_June_1987_Type-Ins), which was a bit of a Type-Ins bumper issue with Graphical, some Games, a Disc Filecopy programme and some Character Font programmes for Italic, Bold & Thin Fonts.

Quote
3. Twister


Posted about this one too soon. What I didn't say about it was I made some modifications to it and posted it in here (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/programming/silly-programming-ideas-turning-text-into-graphics/msg53835/#msg53835), after I created a Smooth Physical Scroll to Roll the Screen up, I can't remember if I saved a version which altered the colour of it, I just remember having something like that which created an interesting effect.

Quote
4. Twofor1 (Unusual name, I wonder why it was called this)


Yes, this is a 10-Liner published in ACU June 1989 (Issue 55 for those counting) under the Title "Two For the Price of One" (or "Two for the Price" if you follow Bill Hamleys  name of it. It consists of 2 Demos, the one shown in your video is the "Dragon" Demo. The other is called "C", but what I cannot work out is if you need to REM line 80 to get the "C" demo, from the looks of it, it looks like it does as the comment is made at the end of Line 70, it's either that or the IF c<2 THEN 9 just before the Comment in Line 70.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 10:28, 20 May 19
Thanks for the links and post,

I am working thru them just now.

So the "C" demo is disabled or incomplete?
What would be the purpose of that?

I have included a short video with this post which was meant to be part of video 7 but frankly after this program took nearly ten minutes to produce one graphic I just gave up. Video 7 (User area 2) should ready Tuesday or Wednesday.
When I have finished with this particular disk I will see what else can be found. I have over two hundred 3.5" D20 disks here which are mostly filled with data (text, email, screen and MicroDesign files) but I'm sure I will find other PD programs that will be of interest.
It is just a pity that some of the better programs I have already looked at (especially the John Valentine "Spatial Data Modelling" files ) are incompatible with the OSSC.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guX-sbd0xSE&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guX-sbd0xSE&feature=youtu.be)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 14:36, 20 May 19
Thanks for the links and post,I am working thru them just now.So the "C" demo is disabled or incomplete?



I actually muddled this twoforone demo, so the demo on show here is the C which draws in C shape from Left to Right onscreen and the one which is hidden away is Dragon.
I looked at your video again and noticed the comment which is printed at the end of Line 60 to be absent in your Video, the original line looks like this:


Code: [Select]
60 PLOT x(p),y(p):DRAW x(p+c),y(p+c):DRAW x(p+c*2),y(p+c*2):REM f=f*-1



If the REM at the end of Line 60 is in place, it will do the C demo, otherwise it will produce the Dragon if the REM is removed.

Quote
What would be the purpose of that?


They are both Graphical problems which require some algorithm to decipher the path they travel hence the pattern they both create. There's information about the Dragon Curve on Rosetta curve (http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Dragon_curve), but the page becomes quite technical without really explaining it's purpose. Last year I coded a Dragon Curve example for Hisoft Pascal, (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/programming/hisoft-pascal-4t/msg163662/#msg163662) based on the ZX Spectrum BASIC and found it to be a Compilers Nightmare due to the nature of the way it Looped around itself and filling up Stack Space eventually ending up Crashing the System.

Quote
I have included a short video with this post which was meant to be part of video 7 but frankly after this program took nearly ten minutes to produce one graphic I just gave up. Video 7 (User area 2) should ready Tuesday or Wednesday.
When I have finished with this particular disk I will see what else can be found. I have over two hundred 3.5" D20 disks here which are mostly filled with data (text, email, screen and MicroDesign files) but I'm sure I will find other PD programs that will be of interest.
It is just a pity that some of the better programs I have already looked at (especially the John Valentine "Spatial Data Modelling" files ) are incompatible with the OSSC.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guX-sbd0xSE&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guX-sbd0xSE&feature=youtu.be)



Yes to like the C + Dragon demo which was in ACU, Spirald.bas was published in AA with some Altered lines and is an alternative version of SPIRALU.BAS, both were in AA15 Type-Ins (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_December_1986_Type-Ins) (Dec '86) with the Alternative Lines published below the SPIRALU demo to make SPIRALD.


I've attached some Screenshots of the C & Dragon Demo Below.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 22:09, 21 May 19
PD Graphics 7.

1. Shapes/Spiral (The Final Chapter)
2. Worm
3. Channel4 (Also loads a binary file)
4. L&R

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIwQIeaJIik&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIwQIeaJIik&feature=youtu.be)


Links:

http://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Pixel (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Pixel)


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_4#On-air_identity (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_4#On-air_identity)


http://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Robot_PD (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Robot_PD)


http://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Scull_PD (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Scull_PD)










Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 12:32, 23 May 19
PD Graphics 7.

1. Shapes/Spiral (The Final Chapter)


Yes so the values entered won't change the output Spiral produces. It has something to do with the RUN"SPIRAL not clearing the DEG mode, which Shapes sets up. From what I recall in your earlier video it uses COS and SIN to store the values into arrays called co() and si() while in DEG more, though SPIRAL just uses COS and SIN to get it's values. In the Manual the RAD command talks about NEW, CLEAR, LOAD & RUN restoring back to the default mode (RAD), it seems to be true for NEW, CLEAR and RUN, but not LOAD, I tested and this doesn't seem to be true, though if I had LOAD"SPIRAL followed by RUN, the RUN would return BASIC to RAD mode.

Quote
2. Worm


I know this one so well, which was published in AA53 Type-Ins (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_February_1990_Type-Ins) (Feb. 1990). It's been modified to add Lines 21 and 22 for the Introduction to it.

Quote
3. Channel4 (Also loads a binary file)


A couple of files are loaded, I was almost expecting it to be a BASIC 1.1 Graphic using MOVE, DRAW, FILL to create the iconic Logo, instead it's a Squeezed (Compressed) Screen followed by some Theme Music which almost sounds like the speaker wants to Escape itself.  :D


I found this little video clip which plays a whole range of variations on the theme which I thought was amusing  :D


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFZ_jrwizWY

Quote
4. L&R

I'm unsure, but this Left & Right Scrolling Demo seems familiar, but I'm unsure what it's from, I may have picked it up on CPC-Power while looking at Scrolling Examples.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 18:59, 25 May 19
PD Graphics 8.

Four text Scrollers.

I have only Listed three so will show the missing one in a later video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwC5VFZ-yGc (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwC5VFZ-yGc)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 08:44, 26 May 19
PD Graphics 8.

Four text Scrollers.

I have only Listed three so will show the missing one in the next video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwC5VFZ-yGc (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwC5VFZ-yGc)


David Hall had some nice ones with Omega Scroll and Alpha Scroll, looks like Omega Scroll became part of the Demon PD Library according to CPC-Rulez (https://cpcrulez.fr/applications_util-compilation-demon_pd-pd_02-graphics.htm). Omega Scroll was merely a 10-Liner with Alpha Scroll becoming a full length Listing which got published in ACU as well as AA Type-Ins (by David).  :)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 13:59, 27 May 19
PD Graphics 9.

Three files this time:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cb67jKQbkc (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cb67jKQbkc)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 13:25, 28 May 19
PD Graphics 10.

This short video shows the Listing for qscroll ( video 8 ) and also zigzag.bas.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tmM0MDgcjM&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tmM0MDgcjM&feature=youtu.be)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 13:27, 28 May 19
I thought there was something vaguely famliar with Titles2 demo which has that "PRESS ANY KEY WHEN YOU HEAR THIS NOISE" message, but the rest of it doesn't seem familiar, so maybe I've seen that message in something else?

The Wordmov1 demo is the Revolving Message from AA24 (Sept '87) Type-Ins (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_September_1987_Type-Ins) (as the Source reveals)   :) I think I tried modifying it at one stage to see if I could get each letter from a Word to Revolve, but it doesn't work like that.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 10:08, 29 May 19
PD Graphics 11.

This time two text scrollers and a nice little 1990 Xmas greeting from the staff at Amstrad Computer User.
Again, it looks like the performance of the 2nd program is affected by not resetting the 6128 after the 1st program has finished.
I will have a look at that in a later video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7G3tNSOo6H8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7G3tNSOo6H8)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 10:40, 29 May 19
PD Graphics 11.

This time two text scrollers and a nice little 1990 Xmas greeting from the staff at Amstrad Computer User.
Again, it looks like the performance of the 2nd program is affected by not resetting the 6128 after the 1st program has finished.
I will have a look at that in a later video.


It's actually from WORDMOV1.BAS (the last programme from the previous demo, I can see the Listing of it at the start of this video, which sets INKs 1,2,3 to 0. The David Hall demo WORDMOV2.BAS only sets INK 1 to Bright Yellow (24) leaving inks 2 & 3 still at 0. The problem in the next programme and even into the Christmas Message when they use INKs 2 & 3 which is set to Black. This is how the Second demo should look.  :)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 08:49, 30 May 19
Thanks for that AMSDOS,

I record a few videos every week or ten days or so and its sometimes hard to remember all the details/background to some of them.

PD Graphics 12.

1. Wordmov3.bas (working this time)

2. The Display Machine (Display.bas) by Richard Fairhurst. This mimics the LED displays often found in shops and businesses. This excellent program and "Bigrscoll" were the only two large text scrollers that were good enough to be used at the All Formats Computer Fairs back in the early to mid-nineties.

http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/applications/bigscroll/ (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/applications/bigscroll/)

There were more programs to be included in this video but unfortunately a hardware problem prevented their inclusion.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYhGGxIKu5o&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYhGGxIKu5o&feature=youtu.be)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 22:54, 17 July 19
PD Graphics 13.

Three programs this time:

1. -GDEM+.BAS - I stopped this before it finished as the countdown sequence causes the OSSC  to lose sync
2. -GRAFIX.BAS
3. -INDENT.BAS


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5vC3VdE3jA&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5vC3VdE3jA&feature=youtu.be)


OSSC
https://www.videogameperfection.com/products/open-source-converter/

Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 13:30, 18 July 19


PD Graphics 13.


Three programs this time:


All from Skull PD by the looks of it, haven't seen them before.




Quote
1. -GDEM+.BAS - I stopped this before it finished as the countdown sequence causes the OSSC  to lose sync


It has some OUT commands in it which seem to be playing around with how the Screen is displayed.


Quote
2. -GRAFIX.BAS


I noticed DINO has a few programmes on CPC-Power, though it doesn't look like this was on there.


Quote
3. -INDENT.BAS


Might be worth testing some of those alternative FILL routines on this one, though I remember a couple of simple BASIC 10-Liners called Ernie & Bert which drew Ernie & Bert filling in the centre, wonder if that could have been done here. Your Computer ran a little article back in the early days showing how circles could be filled in on a 464.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 14:56, 19 July 19
PD Graphics 14.

1. -LINECYC.BAS
2. -NO-SMOK.BAS
3. -POPSI.BAS
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHtbaG4nnco&t=11s (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHtbaG4nnco&t=11s)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 21:29, 20 July 19
PD Graphics 15.

1. 3DCUBE.BAS
2. CONE.BAS - starts at 1:11, go to 7:40 to see the end product.
3. CUBE.BAS
4. CURTAINS.BAS (curtains?)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FzjCrR37jyA&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FzjCrR37jyA&feature=youtu.be)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 02:58, 21 July 19


PD Graphics 14.


1. -LINECYC.BAS


LINECYC.BAS looks remarkably similar to a graphical from AA called Serpent (https://www.cpc-power.com/index.php?page=detail&num=13056). On initial investigation though, I noticed LINECYC.BAS will run on all CPCs, Serpent was BASIC 1.1 only. However when I did a comparison of source code, LINECYC.BAS is much different. Obviously for LINECYC.BAS it draws 2 moving lines (Serpent only does one), though the means LINECYC.BAS moves the Lines is much different from Serpent and yet they appear to very similarly.


Quote
2. -NO-SMOK.BAS


Ironically this uses that solid drawing cycle that I was thinking of from the Ernie & Bert, which probably could have been used in the -INDENT.BAS demo.



Quote
3. -POPSI.BAS



The OUT commands in this one I think are used to Blank the Screen while it's being drawn, removing them should reveal it's drawing process.

Quote
PD Graphics 15.

1. 3DCUBE.BAS


On my other computer I've created an alternative version of this to improve the animation sequence of it which I can post here if you want.



Quote
2. CONE.BAS - starts at 1:11, go to 7:40 to see the end product.


I'm unsure where this David Hall graphical was published. It doesn't seem to be recorded as being on CPC-POWER, it was written in 1988 which was before ACU got the 10-Liners which as I understand initially came from another magazine, from the looks I think it was CPC Computing Magazine, but that all changed from July 1989 when ACU changed it's Logo again to feature Arnie as The Running Man.
Actually scratch all that, I was published in April 1989 issue of ACU. I couldn't find on CPC-POWER because ACU hasn't completely documented all the ACU 10-Liners on their Archive.


Quote
3. CUBE.BAS


This looks familiar too and must of been a 10-Liner from ACU. I think it must be Strange Cube by David Mortell which was published March 1989 issue of ACU.

Quote
4. CURTAINS.BAS (curtains?)


Bill Hamley made some nice Graphical 10-Liners for ACU and as this one suggests was published in June 1989 issue of ACU. Earlier you had the C and Dragon combo demos, my favourite of his came later from the August 1990 issue of ACU called Endless.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 08:11, 21 July 19
Hi Amsdos,

Thanks for the link and the background info.

Re. 3DCUBE - Yes if you could post the listing for the alternate version I'm sure that would be of interest to readers of this thread, though for me personally it would be a "pearl before swine"  ::)

In video 17 (will be published in a day or so) I have already recorded a file called "ENDLESS.BAS" which may be the Bill Hamley program you refer to - unfortunately there are no REM statements to confirm that.

Cheers,

Peter
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 12:24, 21 July 19

Re. 3DCUBE - Yes if you could post the listing for the alternate version I'm sure that would be of interest to readers of this thread, though for me personally it would be a "pearl before swine"  ::) 

You'll probably agree that the Movement of the Cube has improved. The original Code was Drawing the Cube in MODE 2 which leaves no room for INK animation. My version is in MODE 1, so I can DRAW one, followed by another invisibly, switch INKs, Delete the Old Cube, Draw the next Cube invisibly, switch inks and the whole Main Loop works around that basically. As for the Source Code, my version looks like a whole new demo with only the DRAWing remaining the same. The code has blown out because I needed additional variables to Delete the Old Cube, which resulted in a Series of points to erase the old cube position. The only odd thing about it is when it begins as a square, because of the way the cube draws and redraws, Exclusive OR (XOR) Screen Mode is used to quickly remove the old cube.


Code: [Select]

100 MODE 1:INK 1,26:INK 2,1:INK 3,26:BORDER 26:DEG
110 PRINT CHR$(23)+CHR$(1)
120 ORIGIN 320,200:x=200:s=5:c=1
130 n=0
140 GOSUB 2000:c=1:GOSUB 1000
150 c=2
160 n=n+s
170 GOSUB 3000
180 GOSUB 2000:GOSUB 1000:c=1:GOSUB 4000
190 n=n+s:GOSUB 3000
200 INK 2,26:INK 1,1
210 c=1:GOSUB 2000:GOSUB 1000
220 c=2:GOSUB 4000
230 INK 2,1:INK 1,26
240 GOTO 150
1000 MOVE (b+w+a)/2,(m+r+h)/2
1010 DRAWR -w,-r,c:DRAWR -a,-h:DRAWR w,r
1020 MOVE (-b-w+a)/2,(-m-r+h)/2
1030 DRAWR w,r:DRAWR -a,-h:DRAWR -w,-r
1040 MOVE (b-w+a)/2,(m-r+h)/2
1050 DRAWR -b,-m:DRAWR -a,-h:DRAWR b,m
1060 MOVE (-b+w+a)/2,(-m+r+h)/2
1070 DRAWR b,m:DRAWR -a,-h:DRAWR -b,-m
1080 RETURN
2000 b=x*COS(n):m=0:q=x*SIN(n)
2010 w=-(q*q)/x:r=b:f=b*q/x:a=f:h=q
2020 z=-w-x:RETURN
3000 ob=b:om=m:oq=q
3010 ow=w:olr=r:of=f:oa=a:oh=h
3020 oz=z:RETURN
4000 MOVE (ob+ow+oa)/2,(om+olr+oh)/2
4010 DRAWR -ow,-olr,c:DRAWR -oa,-oh:DRAWR ow,olr
4020 MOVE (-ob-ow+oa)/2,(-om-olr+oh)/2
4030 DRAWR ow,olr:DRAWR -oa,-oh:DRAWR -ow,-olr
4040 MOVE (ob-ow+oa)/2,(om-olr+oh)/2
4050 DRAWR -ob,-om:DRAWR -oa,-oh:DRAWR ob,om
4060 MOVE (-ob+ow+oa)/2,(-om+olr+oh)/2
4070 DRAWR ob,om:DRAWR -oa,-oh:DRAWR -ob,-om
4080 RETURN

Quote
In video 17 (will be published in a day or so) I have already recorded a file called "ENDLESS.BAS" which may be the Bill Hamley program you refer to - unfortunately there are no REM statements to confirm that.

It wouldn't surprise me, the original code published in ACU actually has 11 Lines, I've attached an image of it below.


Cheers.

Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 09:51, 22 July 19
PD Graphics 16.

1. -RAYCLIP.BAS
2. -ROTATE.BAS
3. -TD.BAS
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaAR8NKfmSw (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaAR8NKfmSw)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 12:28, 22 July 19
Seriously, I had to Google Taylor Dayne to get Total Recall, a lot of work has gone into to Produce that nice Text, like the Channel 4, I thought this might of included some Digitized Music.

Again I couldn't find these demos on CPC-Power, Andrew (who is also referred to as Andy) Price contributed some Type-Ins for AA and ACU, but I remember him more for his Mastering Machine Code Series AA72-AA82 as I may not of taken up Assembly if it wasn't for him.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 14:43, 23 July 19
PD Graphics 17.

1. ENDLESS.BAS - not quite endless, when making this video I thought I recognised it from a previous video so cut it short.
And yes @AMSDOS (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=330) it indeed looks like the program by Bill Hamley that you LISTed earlier in the thread. :)
2. FANCYCLS.BAS
3. FLOWER.BAS
4. FUZZY.BAS - this one is strictly for nostalgic fans of late night/early morning analogue TV, unfortunately the audio is out of sync by 9 seconds. Regarding the audio, I played ATF (Advanced Tactical Fighter by Digital Integration) for years and the audio component when the plane is in flight sounds identical to the output from this BASIC file, any ideas?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_SZv_idF8w (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_SZv_idF8w)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 12:44, 25 July 19
PD Graphics 17.

1. ENDLESS.BAS - not quite endless, when making this video I thought I recognised it from a previous video so cut it short.
And yes @AMSDOS (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=330) it indeed looks like the program by Bill Hamley that you LISTed earlier in the thread. :) 


I remember that issue of ACU quite well, having starting to collect AA in 1989, my Dad brought a couple of them in the early years, though one month (in 1989) I must of missed AA and brought ACU which was the 1st issue with the new look logo and Arnie as the Running Man. I remember being very disappointed with that magazine as it had no 10-Liners in it and one large BASIC 1.1 Listing. It was a bit frustrating having a 464 then as I was becoming more serious about typing in Type-Ins and not really knowing what I could or couldn't do. As a result of that magazine, I decided not to take another look until the following year. The 1st magazine I got that year I think was August 1990 issue with the Snow Strike plane on the front page, which had 2 of Bills Demos in it, Endless and Balls in the Air which was cute.



Quote
2. FANCYCLS.BAS


This ones a mystery, it reminds me of the Mosiac (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/Amstrad_Action_June_1989_Type-Ins) Listing from AA45 Type-Ins, except this is in Mode 2. Unsure if it would have been a Type-In as one of the Lines has a Control Code in it (they usually become a Nightmare to Print in a Magazine as it may show as something else or not at all).

Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 08:47, 28 July 19
PD Graphics 18.

1. GRAP.BAS
2. GRAPHO.BAS - "Improper argument in 10" - ?
3. GROOVY.BAS
4. HEART.BAS - For Valentine's day
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjtQRi0wsMY (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjtQRi0wsMY)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 09:51, 28 July 19
I only recognise HEART.BAS which is Valentine and was published in the March 1989 issue of ACU. Looks like it was written on a 464 and is using PLOT to slowly Fill the Heart.  :o


I'm unsure where Groovy is from, through the Listing appears as if it came from a Magazine.


GRAPHO.BAS - I don't know why it's an Improper Argument in 10, perhaps KEY 139 is an illegal key number? Perhaps Delete that line then RUN it, from the looks Line 10 is only there for when the Coder had to do some Debugging.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 10:05, 28 July 19
Hi AMSDOS,

Yes, I'll delete that line next time I'm back in Glasgow and see what the result is.

Cheers,

Peter
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 17:54, 04 August 19
PD Graphics 19.

1. GRAPHO.BAS - working this time (thanks @AMSDOS (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=330) ) - this one needs a health warning attached
2. HOLE.BAS - a duplicate? Seems like I've seen this before, also it is slow in operation go to 10:00 to see the finished product.
3. HYPNO.BAS (AKA Space Tunnel)
4. HYPNOTIC.BAS
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyEpqJp87ks (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyEpqJp87ks)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 14:00, 05 August 19
PD Graphics 19.

1. GRAPHO.BAS - working this time (thanks @AMSDOS (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=330) ) - this one needs a health warning attached


Very Unusual.

Quote
2. HOLE.BAS - a duplicate? Seems like I've seen this before, also it is slow in operation go to 10:00 to see the finished product.


Seems to start off the same way as -INDENT.BAS from PD Graphics 13, though -INDENT.BAS continues a series of FILLs. This might have been written by the same person perhaps? Seems to be an unknown author.

Quote
3. HYPNO.BAS (AKA Space Tunnel)


From AA18 Type-Ins known as Space Tunnel.

Quote
4. HYPNOTIC.BAS


Funny I didn't recognise this one, but was published in AA15 Type-Ins (Dec '86).
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 17:33, 08 August 19
PD Graphics 20.

1. KSCOPE.BAS
2. KSCOPE1.BAS
3. MODEFOUR.BAS - LISTed only
4. MORSE.BAS - LISTED only
5. NEBULA.BAS
6. NUMBERS.BAS

MODEFOUR and MORSE don't play with the OSSC so if anyone can tell me what they do I'd appreciate it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sl24uu2HjfM
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 05:27, 09 August 19
PD Graphics 20.

1. KSCOPE.BAS
2. KSCOPE1.BAS


I thought I saw these in an earlier video, but yeah now their running in MODE 2 (instead of MODE 1 which is what I thought they did), the 2nd version (the faster of the two) has a Direct Control Code in it, making it a Magazines Nightmare if they were going to Publish it. The Control Code I suspect is to change the Screen Write Mode, normally this defaults as Fill, but here I think they have changed it to XOR, which works by Write Character to screen to PRINT it, write it again in the same position, Character is deleted. A good example of that is Sean McManus' Easi-Sprite Driver with Printed Batman Sprite Demonstration.


Quote
3. MODEFOUR.BAS - LISTed only


There are others here which will know more about the OUT commands, the ones used here relate to the Video to generate effects, things like Overscan to print an image across the entire screen with No Border is an example of that, but here what they have done is Stretch the Screen, so instead of 25 Lines you only get 15 and the Black Lines through the Cursor are as a result of that Stretch, so now the MODE 0 Cursor looks like a Square instead of a Rectangle. The other lines which follow the OUT commands (to generate that 'Fourth Mode') are there to tell BASIC to restrict itself to that new mode, put simply BASIC doesn't know that 10 Lines are Missing and still thinks there are 25 Lines, which there is, but 10 Lines have been hidden away & you can only see them when you push the text up the screen with Return/Enter or the Down Arrow Key for example, so it's the WINDOW #0 job to only show that 20x15 Lines. The ORIGIN which follows it does pretty much the same thing for the Graphical Cursor, so the ORIGIN will now move the Graphical Cursor 160 up the screen, so now a PLOT 0,0,15 will PLOT a bottom point Left Corner of the New screen, like the WINDOW if ORIGIN were changed back to its original position 0,0 the pixel won't be screen as it is now offscreen. This demo Sets up the Screen INKs before using the OUT sequence, the reason for that is once the OUT commands are used, INKs won't be changed unless the Screen MODE changes (I can't quite explain the reasoning for that, I think it's just something which happens when Direct Hardware is used with BASIC which talks to the Firmware and Firmware with Direct Hardware don't necessarily know what's occurred.

Quote
4. MORSE.BAS - LISTED only


Not sure about this one, guessing you type in a message and it converts it to Morse Code, normally the Morse Code type-ins I've seen convert a Message into the SOUNDs produced, but there's no SOUND in this one, by the looks the Message is converted to a series of 1s and 0s.

Quote
5. NEBULA.BAS
6. NUMBERS.BAS


NUMBER.BAS is Selection Sort by Willie Lawrie, published Sept. 1989 Issue of ACU as a 10-Liner, just as NEBULA.BAS was as Spiral Nebula by Ian Graham in Feb. 1990 Issue of ACU.


EDIT: I've attached some screenshots of the MODE 4 example, one of the actual demo and a second after I did a BORDER 1:MODE 0 to show it's Box Screen.

Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 08:03, 09 August 19
Thanks for the info and screenshots @AMSDOS (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=330) ,

Next and possibly final video will be posted Saturday. The few programs left on these disks cause the OSSC to lose sync and therefore can't be recorded. So if you (or anyone else) has seen a program of interest in the Catalogue of these discs that hasn't been in a previous video let me know and I will LIST it.

Cheers,

Peter
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 08:48, 09 August 19
Cool,  I was trying to work out which one of those earlier demos KSCOPE1.BAS was from and discovered it was FANCYCLS.BAS. The Source Code is identical.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: rambler on 10:11, 09 August 19
MORSE.BAS
Show the letters you type in as morse code.
SOS will be ...---...



Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the eighties/nineties
Post by: ChaRleyTroniC on 20:31, 09 August 19
2. The Display Machine (Display.bas) by Richard Fairhurst. This mimics the LED displays often found in shops and businesses. This excellent program and "Bigrscoll" were the only two large text scrollers that were good enough to be used at the All Formats Computer Fairs back in the early to mid-nineties.




I just watched that and wondered who the Zoe was that I was supposedly saying hi to... but I think Alan Scully must have changed the scrolling message.  :D
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 20:38, 09 August 19
Zoe also features in at least one other scroller from Scull PD so maybe scrollers were the CPC equivalent of Tinder back then ;)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 10:26, 10 August 19
Video 21A.

Unfortunately, unless I find another graphics disk this will be the last video in this series.
Please note that audio is out of sync by about 9 seconds.

This time:

1. PATTERNS.BAS
2. PRIMES.BAS - Ooops! Prime number generator.
3. PUDDLE.BAS
4. QUIKSNOW.BAS
5. SHAPE3D.BAS - Duplicate?
6. SNOW.BAS - Snow no show - any idea why?
7. SNOWFLAK.BAS
8. WHEEL.BAS - Looks familiar
9. WIRE.BAS -Not much to see here
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mPTm0_P4Ys (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mPTm0_P4Ys)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 14:18, 10 August 19
Video 21.

Unfortunately, unless I find another graphics disk this will be the last video in this series.
Please note that audio is out of sync by about 9 seconds.

This time:

1. PATTERNS.BAS
2. PRIMES.BAS - Ooops! Prime number generator.
3. PUDDLE.BAS
4. QUIKSNOW.BAS
5. SHAPE3D.BAS - Duplicate?


No I noticed this was a part of Video 4 of this thread.

Quote
6. SNOW.BAS - Snow no show - any idea why?


There's a Syntax Error in Line 40 (it should read POKE i,RND*255 instead of POKE i,RND255), but the problem is Line 30 sets all the Colours to 0, so you cannot see anything.
It's nothing exciting though and I think you would of ran into problems showing this in the Video as it uses the Hardware Video effects to make the Screen Wobble all over the place, hence a TV Snow effect, requiring a Reset. Takes about 90 seconds to set that up before it does it's thing.

Quote
7. SNOWFLAK.BAS


Seems to be a popular theme here in Oz!

Quote
8. WHEEL.BAS - Looks familiar


Ditto, but couldn't find from where - may have viewed it in earlier video.

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9. WIRE.BAS -Not much to see here


That's because it uses Joystick to draw Lines Up/Down/Left Right on the Screen, Fire Button will change the Colour. Once you're finished Drawing a Pattern, Pressing the Space Bar takes you to another part of the programme which I think Rotates the Colours around until the Fire Button is pressed.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 15:00, 10 August 19
Thanks @AMSDOS (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=330) ,

I'll have another look at SNOW.BAS and WIRE.BAS tomorrow.

Cheers,

Peter
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 17:14, 10 August 19
Funny the things you find sometimes .......

NUMBERS.BAS from video No. 20

http://www.lawrieweb.com/www/amstrad.html (http://www.lawrieweb.com/www/amstrad.html)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: Nich on 12:09, 11 August 19
I'll have another look at SNOW.BAS and WIRE.BAS tomorrow.

Be careful with SNOW.BAS. It sends random values to the CRTC chip to make it simulate a broken TV display that needs retuning - but sending random values to the CRTC is not a good idea as I think it may damage your monitor if the program is left running for too long!
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 17:20, 11 August 19
Thanks for the heads up Nich,

Ran it for two minutes this morning and all I got was a black screen so just gave up on it.







Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 12:20, 12 August 19
Be careful with SNOW.BAS. It sends random values to the CRTC chip to make it simulate a broken TV display that needs retuning - but sending random values to the CRTC is not a good idea as I think it may damage your monitor if the program is left running for too long!


 ???  I should have picked that up. ACU must of got into all sorts of trouble for publishing it, having said that I remember the one-liner Shabaz Yousaf wrote, which also sends random values to &BD00, which ironically comes from the Smash TV Issue of AA (75). Would have to be the most unless of codes surely?  >:(


Later on I remember a reader writing to AA regarding Overscan in their Forum section, but no source code was actually provided.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 12:24, 12 August 19
FUZZY.BAS (Video 17) was OK to use?
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: pelrun on 13:42, 12 August 19
FUZZY is fine, but it relies on the CPC firmware leaving CRTC register 13 selected after a MODE change, as it doesn't select it explicitly. Had to go check that one.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 14:15, 12 August 19
FUZZY is fine, but it relies on the CPC firmware leaving CRTC register 13 selected after a MODE change, as it doesn't select it explicitly. Had to go check that one.


I'm not as sure as it has no "OUT &BC00,x" prior to OUT &BD00,INT(RND*256)", so it leaves me thinking what Register is it meant to be selecting. A lack of one has me assuming it's meant to be Register 0 - "OUT &BC00,0" for Horizontal Total. In that case and I'm using the Naked Video guide from AA53 as Reference, Recovery Ranges (values which will be able to acceptable within a BASIC programme and allowed to be restored back to normal with "OUT &BD00,63"), between 46 & 255. Shabaz Yousaf's TV Demo from the AA75 Type-Ins also has the same instruction minus the Register it's meant to be selecting.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: pelrun on 15:27, 12 August 19
I'm not as sure as it has no "OUT &BC00,x" so it leaves me thinking what Register is it meant to be selecting.


That's why I said I had to check it. MODE definitely returns with register 13 selected, and the program doesn't do anything that would change it afterwards.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 07:59, 15 August 19
Video 21B - WIRE.BAS revisited.

Cheers @AMSDOS (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=330) for the joystick hint - the second I started to use it I remembered playing about with this program 25  :o  years ago.
It seems to me like a much more primitive version of the commercial program "Pyschedelia" by Jeff Minter - both allow the displayed graphic to be modified by the user.

Wikipedia entry:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychedelia_(light_synthesizer (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychedelia_(light_synthesizer))

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3hQlqHk8VE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3hQlqHk8VE)
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 01:16, 17 August 19




That's why I said I had to check it. MODE definitely returns with register 13 selected, and the program doesn't do anything that would change it afterwards.


Sorry, I misread your comments about register 13 being selected, I did a quick test with CPCBox which seems to be the case, so Register 13 represents the Low Byte of the screen, adjusting that with whatever value (0-255), shifts the screen horizontally, so it shouldn't be any problems with that particular register.



Video 21B - WIRE.BAS revisited.

Cheers @AMSDOS (http://www.cpcwiki.eu/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=330) for the joystick hint - the second I started to use it I remembered playing about with this program 25  :o  years ago.
It seems to me like a much more primitive version of the commercial program "Pyschedelia" by Jeff Minter - both allow the displayed graphic to be modified by the user.



I'm familiar with Pyschedelia (https://www.cpc-power.com/index.php?page=detail&num=4226) but haven't used it, it seems Jeff Minter wrote the original and was ported to the Amstrad by Simon Freeman.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: ComSoft6128 on 09:39, 13 October 19
NEWGRAP.BAS

Modified version of GRAP.BAS from video 18.
From the WACCI PD library.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTAPMMu325A&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTAPMMu325A&feature=youtu.be)

https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/WACCI (https://www.cpcwiki.eu/index.php/WACCI)

Not emulated - original hardware and software
Please note that the aspect ratio for this YouTube video is 16:9 but the CPC monitor has an aspect ratio of 4:3 so you may wish to adjust your viewing device accordingly.
Title: Re: Small PD Graphic display files from the Eighties/Nineties
Post by: AMSDOS on 12:15, 13 October 19
I've seen similiar pattern generator demos before, though what stands out about this one is the control codes it has placed on the 1st couple of lines of the code, which make it a problem if they were to be published in a magazine. The 1st line for exmaple has a Machine code routine embeded after the Apostophe to indicate a Comment line, I remember noticing a Game from a French Magazine using the same techique, though couldn't get it to work, probably because I didn't understand what the accented u on their keyboard meant, which I think on an English keyboard is the Bar Command for RSX, but there might of been others I've forgotten about.