Author Topic: Proof that the Commodre 64 palette is far superior to the Amstrad CPC.  (Read 12183 times)

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Offline MacDeath

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good question, is there even an application to product some diaporama disks ? with possible inclusion of things with tricks or browser options ?

Offline Sykobee (Briggsy)

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Wish they would try more often at Pixel joint...



Amstrad CPC mockup @ PixelJoint.com


Amazing use of colours here, good separation of different aspects (blue background and leafy decoration (1 shared colour, dark on leaves, highlight on background, works very well)), and the red/greenred/orange/yellow colour ramp. Probably the foreground grass-on-rocks shouldn't be there as it confuses the leafy decoration you can walk in front of with the solid rock, but it's definitely not a big issue. Also the best plum gfx on the CPC so far.

Offline MacDeath

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love the use of the "cold green" gradiant, with dark cyan and sea green... this reflects the blue of the background onto the foliage. That's how you use the hybrid colours...

Offline invent

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Hello Everyone :)


I thought I would share another technique that might be useful in generating dither automatically with fixed colour palettes in Mode 0 (16) or Mode 1 (4).


Rediscovered a very interesting Photoshop file that has different effects layers that basically converted any greyscale image into 4 or 16 colours depending on the mode your using.


Firstly go visit Dan Fesslers blog on HD Index Patterns it will better explain the concept.





The example Gradient Maps for Mode 0 (16 colours) and Mode 1 (4 colours)






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Offline invent

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One last test.


Mode 1, (4 colours)  This photoshop file is based off Dan's Photoshop file but I have edited the gradient ramp. 
If you use Photoshop use the greyscale gradient at the top of the page to draw/shade with and it will automatically create the dithered pattern in realtime.


I haven't found (yet) a better dither layer than what Dan has come up with, but if you do you would have potentially more dither patterns.




For anyone who would like to try this, here is the Photoshop file.



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Offline ||C|-|E||

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This is extremely interesting! I will shortly have a look a it, thank you!!  :D :D

Online Gryzor

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I'm not trained enough to see the differences, but I love the result :)

Offline Oliver Lindau

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Old thread I know ;)

Well, few months ago something happened in the C64 colour emulation. The guy who set the colour basis for current emulators revised it in a less palette-wise but more colourscheme-wise approach. Fortunately this also turned out to more authentic tones and finally yellow looks like yellow as shown on original hardware and not the greenyellow something.

Most interesting part of this approach is that it simulates the adjustment knobs of a 1084s monitor and works as a palette generator. Same time it supports different chip revisions, NTSC/PAL colours and in addition  VIC20 and +4. Btw it is the first time I've seen something that produces proper colours even with maximum saturation settings.

On the website it is possible to switch between different graphics. If you are playing with the adjustments you might notice that some graphics look better with higher saturation and some with lower. This is not mainly because of the palette - it reflects in a way the settings the artist used. For example artists like Joe, Mirage, Mermaid or Carrion pixel their works with about 50% saturation. Robin Levy, STE'86 or me (Veto) using higher saturation, I recommend about 70% (I guess you agree that my picture "Room with a View" looks way more vibrant with my own settings).

What you also might recognise that with higher saturation the colour dark red really turns out red. Or yellow stays yellow. This is how the colours really look like on the original hardware and not the overall brownish-dirty-washedout-whatever.

This is the link to the website:
http://www.colodore.com/

Online Bryce

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Interesting, however the real C64 hardware still gives a dull, brown picture compared to the real Amstrad hardware.... vibrant colours without having to faff around with any emulator settings :)

Bryce.

Online Gryzor

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Very interesting post by Oliver and I did visit the page.


Reminds me of a question I posted here years ago -how are colours 'decided' when doing an emulator?


However, although that page and project are quite lovely, they attempt to kind of change the narrative. Which has always been, CPC fans laughing at the shite palette of the c64 and c64 fans laughing at the garish gfx of the CPC. I mean, it's not something new, it's what people always thought.


And true enough - I've used real c64s of course, and I've seen videos captured from the real hardware. Heck, even on that page, if you turn the saturation up colours still look like they're dull with their saturation pushed to the maximum; whereas with a CPC, if you turn the saturation to the max it makes your eyes bleed.


So, I'm not sure it represents something more 'real'...