User:ZoeRobinson

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Hi! I'm Zoe Kirk-Robinson, and I do stuff. I got my first CPC 464 in 1985 and was hooked right away. In the early nineties I launched my own PD library, initially calling it Robin PD but quickly changing that to Technol PD (I thought it sounded cool and futuristic at the time) when it turned out there already was a Robin PD.

I wrote a fair amount of text adventures that were released through Technol PD, notably:

  • The Troll – A medieval fantasy about a hunter tasked with tracking down and defeating a troll
  • The Maze – A fantasy adventure where you were stuck in a maze with a vast array of fantastic creatures and had to escape
  • Treble-N – An urban fantasy tale where you were tasked with uncovering a magic conspiracy to destroy a small town. One of my personal favourites.
  • Splitship – A sci-fi tale where you had to uncover how and why your spaceship had been duplicated, then restore the original ship from its two duplicates before they disintegrated.
  • The Life of Nob T. Mouse – an early outing for the characters from my first webcomic. You played as Nob Mouse and you had to escape his home in order to defeat Frederick’s evil plans to destroy Blob City.

My latest game is The Quest For The CPCine Disk of Power!, a short choose-your-own-adventure style game written in BASIC. You can download a copy from this wiki.

I also tried creating a 3D adventure game using 3D Construction Kit. Part one was released as Nob 2: The Legend of the Mouse but the full story was never completed. If anyone has a copy of part one still knocking around, I would love to see it again.

In more recent times, I produce CPCine, the Amstrad CPC Video Magazine on YouTube. It's a documentary series that charts the life of the CPC one month at a time, from its release in 1984 to its eventual demise (and very likely beyond that, too). You can see the show [from this YouTube Playlist].

I also collate the list of Missing software, a project that seeks to identify all the games, applications, educational software and other programs that were published (or at the very least, announced for release) for the Amstrad CPC and Plus computers but which never made it into preservation.